The First Trees are Planted

Yesterday I planted out our first trees.

There was no pomp and ceremony. Not loudly anyway.

I carted up several loads of sandy soil and dumped them on the growing swale at the top of the slope. I filled up several more and left them by the swale. I gathered the soaked cardboard, the composted pig manure, the 3 dead sea birds gathered from the shoreline this morning and the dead puffer fish and lay them out ready next to the loquats and avocadoes.

Three of those lucky trees got a ceremonial burial. Two with Short-tailed Shearwaters, each already a couple of days deceased and one with a Silver gull. Definitely much deader than the shearwaters and smelling the worse for it.

I did it with as much reverence and conscious thought as I could muster. I was hot, tired and couldn’t even be bothered to try to entice the family up to take part. I piled on the sand from the buckets I had standing by and watered them each. On another swale I planted acacia. It will eventually join with the fruit tree swale to become one long swale stretching the top of the block. I just need a passage through at the moment while I work up there.

As I gathered up some pea hay and a jar of assorted seeds I’ve had waiting for years for such an opportunity, the Littlest Little Fella came outside and offered to help. I was so grateful.

“Yes please. You’ve come just at the fun part.”

We walked up the back and scattered pea straw gently like confetti over the newly planted trees. Then I gave him a handful of seeds to scatter in amongst the pea straw so that hopefully they will grow to bind the soil and keep the trees happy. Making a good show of things before the kikuyu inevitably snakes its way in. The resilient grass will also bind the swale soil and the trees are tall enough and sturdy enough that once they take a hold it will be easy enough to keep the grass managed. It’s a very uninspiring photo that one on the bottom there, but as the trees grow it will look a bit more impressive.

The main thing is, in the meantime, they are at least in the soil and growing.

the first trees pp

About Petit Paradis

I am on a journey with my family to transition as closely as practicable to a state of self-reliance in suburbia. I practice permaculture principles in our house, garden and community. We are on the southern coast of Western Australia. To our north is the rest of the world. To the south, Antarctica.
This entry was posted in Plants, Use & Value Diversity, Use & Value Renewable Resources & Services, Use Edges & Value the Marginal and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to The First Trees are Planted

  1. tonytomeo says:

    Hey, I just planted the first tiny fig tree in the garden here yesterday too! (I could do so over winter like I should have.) Well, if you wrote this yesterday, then my fig tree was a day after yours, and with the time difference, well, who knows. I won’t do the math. Your projects are certainly more ambitious, and more long term. Although I expect my new fig tree to be around a while, the garden will be taken over by someone else. It must be nice to be able to plan for so many fruit trees, and the rest of the garden that goes with it. Young trees are not much to look at when newly installed, but we know their potential. Does it stay warm enough there for them to disperse roots through winter? That is why I put mine in during autumn, if possible.

    Like

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